all the young pros

 

Aiding in the quest to spread Goodwill's mission is the Young Professionals Council. Members of the YPC act as brand ambassadors for Goodwill, familiarizing the community with the organization’s mission.

“People are surprised that Goodwill is more than where you buy cheap clothes, or where they can donate things,” said Samantha Penabad, chair of the Young Professionals Council. “We are able to change people's perception of what Goodwill does.”

Penabad, 26, works as a strategy consultant for Accenture Development Partnerships, helping organizations develop and accomplish their goals. She became involved with Goodwill and the YPC through her employer.

YPC's Board members at a retreat: Tahira Christmon, Melissa Sullivan, Samantha Penabad, Gloria Chou, Evelyn Smith, and Greg Allis./Photo courtesy of Melissa Sullivan 

YPC's Board members at a retreat: Tahira Christmon, Melissa Sullivan, Samantha Penabad, Gloria Chou, Evelyn Smith, and Greg Allis./Photo courtesy of Melissa Sullivan 

As chair, Penabad manages the day-to-day operations of YPC, including strategy and membership recruitment. A good YPC member, she said, is “intensely excited about community service.”

Members of the Young Professionals Council come from a wide range of professional backgrounds, but share the common goal of wanting to help Goodwill spread its mission.

“For me it has to do with providing opportunities, whether it be educational or vocational, for those in our community who have been affected by disabilities and disadvantages,” said Melisa Sullivan, YPC’s vice president of events. “I see Goodwill as a sort of safe haven. It's about empowering these individuals to live in a self-sustaining way.”

Sullivan, 29, has worked on Capitol Hill and in campaign finance fundraising. She has been a part of the Young Professionals Council since 2012.

The YPC is tasked with creating events that fit the lifestyle of DC’s young professionals, finding fun and unusual ways to engage them.

Guests browse the racks at the Goodwill Edited Summer Trunk Show, co-hosted by the Young Professionals Council.

Guests browse the racks at the Goodwill Edited Summer Trunk Show, co-hosted by the Young Professionals Council.

“On any night in DC, you can go to 15 or 20 happy hours for a charitable organization,” Sullivan said. “We want to think outside the box. We want to engage people where they are.”

On July 11, the YPC will host a charity spinning event at Zengo Cycle in Logan Circle. While in the past, YPC has joined in on larger Goodwill events, this year the leadership is working toward more autonomy. Possible future events include a paint-and-sip, a cooking class, and thematic pop-up shops.

In addition to planning and attending events, members of the Young Professionals Council must meet a volunteer requirement, taking part in Goodwill’s programs. That can take the form of assisting with resume development, unloading donations, or anything in between.

“It’s important to be out there and see the impact that Goodwill has and see the people who are benefitting from these programs,” Sullivan said.

Hurley recalls a fashion show Goodwill held in Sept. 2014. The recent graduating class from the hospitality program was invited to walk down the runway. More than 200 people, who all now have jobs with Marriott, stepped up.

“They had huge smiles,” Hurley said. “Some of them were dancing. It was very moving, knowing the impact the program had on them.”